Health Reform Hub Blogs

On Friday, Oct. 13, 2017,the Trump Administration announced it would no longer make cost-sharing reduction (CSR) payments to insurers offering coverage on health insurance marketplaces. The announcement cited guidance from the US Department Justice that questioned the legality of the appropriation for these payments (for more Cost Sharing Reduction Debate: Why This Matters and How […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    The Graham-Cassidy amendment represented a radical overhaul of how health care coverage is financed and delivered, raising anew the question of federalism – what should the federal government guarantee and how much state variation should be supported? The legislation tossed most critical health care coverage and policy decisions to states without giving them sufficient time or […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    Time is running out for Congress to reform the nation’s health care system, and the Senate is considering two options that could impact state health care policies dramatically. The choices include a bipartisan bill to stabilize the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) insurance markets and give states the information they need to set insurance rates for […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    This month, the Senate Health Education and Labor (HELP) committee began to craft a bipartisan bill to bring short-term stability to the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) individual insurance market. The committee, led by Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and ranking member Patty Murray (D-WA), hosted a series of four hearings featuring insurance commissioners, consumer advocates, a […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    As Congress returns from its summer break, the country is two months away from the start of open enrollment in the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) marketplace, leaving little time for policymakers to develop solutions for 2018. With bipartisan hearings on market stabilization scheduled, this blog examines how different approaches to calculating risk could help state […]

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  • Cost Sharing Reduction Debate: Why This Matters and How States Are Preparing for an Uncertain Future
    State Health Policy Blog

    An update on CSRs – Aug. 18 Since publication of this blog, two major developments have occurred. The White House indicated that the Administration will make CSR payments for August. The Administration has not commented about future payments; the next is due Sept. 20. On Aug. 15, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released an analysis […]

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  • After recent failed efforts to pass a health care repeal or replace bill, Congress spent much of last week re-grouping on a future healthcare strategy. While most current signals point to the likely end of a full ACA legislative repeal effort, there is pervasive recognition that there are issues that need to be urgently addressed […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    The Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) is being considered under a special legislative process known as budget reconciliation, which limits debate and allows a bill to pass with a simple majority. Reconciliation rules include the Byrd Rule requiring that bills passed through this process only include changes that directly affect the federal budget. On July […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    This week, the Senate released two bills as part of its efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA): A revision to the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA) eliminating the “Ted Cruz Amendment” which provided funding to create coverage alternatives for high-risk individuals (see our revised chart) and; The Obamacare Repeal Reconciliation Act (ORRA), a […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    As Congress debates the future of the ACA and Medicaid funding, one question looms large: What will proposed changes mean to state budgets that are already under significant pressure? On July 6th, after protracted wrangling, Illinois enacted its first budget in two years. Maine and New Jersey experienced brief shut downs and Washington narrowly avoided […]

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