Children’s Health

Federal funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is currently set to end in September 2017, and states need to be prepared for the possibility that Congress will not act to extend the funding. Medicaid expansion CHIP programs are required through the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) maintenance of effort (MOE) provision to maintain eligibility […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    Nearly one in five Americans has some type of diagnosable mental health disorder. With these disorders costing $201 billion in 2013, behavioral health is a critical issue for state health policymakers. Children, including very young children, can experience mental health problems, and addressing these issues early can improve outcomes and lessen costs. Approximately 15 percent […]

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  • Without Congressional action, federal funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is due to end in September 2017. The National Academy for State Health Policy (NASHP) created this infographic to highlight the main policy and operational issues that would need to be considered and addressed in states with separate CHIP programs if future federal funding […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    Last week the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its long-awaited final rule outlining requirements for managed care organizations in Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP). Preliminary NASHP analyses indicate that the final rule provides states with significant flexibility in making changes designed to modernize these federal programs as part of health […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    On April 25, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) released a long-awaited final rule that updates the regulations for managed care organizations in the Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP). These new requirements represent the first major updates to Medicaid and CHIP managed care since 2002. In the intervening years, the percentage […]

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  • Publications

    States have made great strides in providing children in families with low-to-moderate income appropriate and affordable health coverage over the past two decades through Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). The Affordable Care Act (ACA) created new coverage options for other populations, including parents who were previously uninsured. However, the ACA also includes […]

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    March 29, 2016 | Filed under: Children's Health, Front Page, Publications
  • State Health Policy Blog

    According to 2014 Census data more than half (61 percent) of all children in the United States are covered by private insurance, and 43 percent have public coverage (some children with private insurance are also enrolled in Medicaid.) Over the years many efforts, including much of the children’s coverage work at NASHP, have focused on […]

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    March 28, 2016 | Filed under: Children's Health, Front Page, State Health Policy Blog
  • State Health Policy Blog

    The Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) third annual open enrollment period kicked off November 1st and continues through January 31, 2016. During this time, individuals can enroll or renew coverage in qualified health plans through state and federal exchanges. The ACA’s open enrollment period is a great time to focus on reaching and enrolling children as […]

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  • Publications

    What happens when state health programs use separate data systems to serve the same population, such as mothers and children? State policymakers know that when those data systems do not “talk” to one another, states may waste resources on duplicative data entry and system maintenance; providers and state agencies may struggle to access information important […]

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    September 21, 2015 | Filed under: Children's Health, Health IT, Publications
  • State Health Policy Blog

    States have made great strides in enrolling and retaining children in health coverage over the past several years. However, once enrolled, children do not always access screenings and preventive services. A missed well-child visit or a skipped developmental screening can result in undiagnosed and untreated medical issues that when discovered can be costly to treat. […]

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    August 6, 2015 | Filed under: Children's Health, State Health Policy Blog