State Health Policy Blog

Unplanned pregnancies can present a tremendous challenge for many women, healthcare payers and the community, and are associated with a number of negative health outcomes, such as delayed prenatal care and premature births. Efforts like the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) recent guidance and the Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network to Reduce Infant […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    On May 10, 2016, Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy signed legislation limiting most first-time opioid prescriptions to seven days (Pub. Act 16-43). The Vermont General Assembly passed a similar bill earlier this month, which will require the state’s Health Commissioner to adopt rules governing opioid prescribing. (Note: The Vermont law was passed during the final week […]

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    May 17, 2016 | Filed under: Connecticut, State Health Policy Blog, Vermont
  • State Health Policy Blog

    Last Thursday, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released new guidance to clarify and update policies related to how states can improve access to Medicaid coverage and services for incarcerated individuals transitioning back into communities. Based on data from a newly published HHS report, currently 2.2 million individuals are incarcerated and an additional […]

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    May 3, 2016 | Filed under: Front Page, State Health Policy Blog
  • State Health Policy Blog

    Last week the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released its long-awaited final rule outlining requirements for managed care organizations in Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP). Preliminary NASHP analyses indicate that the final rule provides states with significant flexibility in making changes designed to modernize these federal programs as part of health […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    Earlier this year, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Gobeille v. Liberty Mutual dealt a blow to the 18 existing state-run all-payer claims databases (APCDs) by holding that ERISA prevents states from compelling self-funded insurers to report to their data systems. In response to the Court’s decision, a number of state APCDs and/or payers have […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    On April 25, the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) released a long-awaited final rule that updates the regulations for managed care organizations in the Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP). These new requirements represent the first major updates to Medicaid and CHIP managed care since 2002. In the intervening years, the percentage […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    Governor Paul LePage signed into law “An Act to Prevent Opiate Abuse by Strengthening the Controlled Substances Prescription Monitoring Program” (now PL 2015, c. 488) on April 19, 2016, making Maine the second state to pass legislation on the issue this year. In March, Massachusetts passed the nation’s first law limiting first-time opioid prescriptions. Maine’s […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    Engaged in multi-payer payment reforms? Seeking information about the cost of care? About the rate of opioid prescribing? Assessing carriers to generate needed revenue to support state activities like vaccines for children? You might soon hit a federal stoplight. The Supreme Court’s recent decision in Gobeille v Liberty Mutual, which denied the state’s ability to […]

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  • State Health Policy Blog

    According to 2014 Census data more than half (61 percent) of all children in the United States are covered by private insurance, and 43 percent have public coverage (some children with private insurance are also enrolled in Medicaid.) Over the years many efforts, including much of the children’s coverage work at NASHP, have focused on […]

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    March 28, 2016 | Filed under: Children's Health, Front Page, State Health Policy Blog
  • State Health Policy Blog

    On Monday, the United States Supreme Court sent back a Michigan case for a new finding that could forbid state assessments on self funded plans. The Supreme Court told the Sixth Circuit to reconsider its ruling that a Michigan health insurance tax was not preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) in light of the Supreme Court’s decision […]

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    March 17, 2016 | Filed under: Front Page, Michigan, State Health Policy Blog, State Refor(u)m